Residents of a Michigan mobile home park are calling for tougher laws as rents rise | Techy Kings

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OKEMOS, MI – Rats, raw sewage and rent are on the rise.

Residents of a Michigan mobile home park raised concerns in Lansing on Wednesday, Oct. 26, passing a law that would be the first since 1987. will update the state’s residential housing law.

“We were just asking for this package of bills to be passed by the end of the year,” said Holly Hook, a Swartz Creek mobile home owner who founded Michigan Mobile Home Residents for Affordable Housing, after her rent went up.

Related: Residents of a Michigan mobile home park feel stuck as rents rise

House Bills 4238-4304 were introduced last year by Rep. Rep. John Cherry, D-Flint, to provide more protections for Michigan mobile home owners as private equity investors reportedly buy up communities and raise site rents.

This could cause problems for residents who own their homes but not the land beneath them. Older mobile home owners are especially struggling to pay their bills. A quarter say they “sometimes or often” can’t afford to buy groceries, and 22% say they can’t pay at least their energy bill, the 2022 survey showed. US Census Bureau survey.

Under the proposed legislation, mobile home park owners would be required to provide residents with one-year leases. It would also enact licensing rules, create a database of mobile home park owners and deny licenses to those with a history of “unjustified rent increases.”

Another component would limit foreclosures on vacated homes by requiring mobile home park owners to purchase abandoned homes at fair market value.

Legislation passed the Michigan House in 2021. in May with both parties voting 204-97.

But they have since stopped.

To pass, the proposed legislation must be approved by the Michigan Senate and signed by Governor Gretchen Whitmer by the end of the year.

Related: Investors buy mobile home parks, rents rise

A half-dozen mobile home owners from Grand Rapids, Holland, Swartz Creek and Warren met with state senators Wednesday in an effort to get the bills passed by the end of the legislative session on Dec. 31.

“The more ears we have, the better the chance,” said Blair Roberts, who has lived with raw sewage in the backyard of his Warren cabin for two years.

Mobile home owners also delivered an open letter to the Michigan Manufactured Housing Association, an industry group that helped draft the legislation. Hook said they were “very disappointed” that the group pulled support from the bills earlier this year.

“I’m here with MHAction to hold the Michigan Manufactured Housing Association accountable for withdrawing support from a package of bills that would have given us basic rights,” she said.

Michigan mobile home owners

Half a dozen mobile home owners on Wednesday, 2022 visited Lansing on Oct. 26 to support a package of bills that would strengthen Michigan’s affordable housing law. They also delivered a letter to the Michigan Manufactured Housing Association after the industry group backed the bills. According to John Lindley, president of the Michigan Manufactured Housing Association, the latest versions included changes to existing laws that “the industry could not support.” (Photo by Rose White | MLive)

The package of bills took seven years of negotiations with residents, consumer advocates and the housing industry. But the latest versions included changes to existing laws that “the industry could not support,” said John Lindley, president of the Michigan Manufactured Housing Association, who did not provide specifics.

Lindley, fielding questions from homeowners, said the first step in passing new residential housing laws would be to “take the conversation out” of the current bill package and “start with a clean slate.”

Without industry support, it’s unclear whether the bills will succeed.

“MMHA members remain focused on providing affordable home ownership and affordable housing opportunities to Michigan residents by managing safe and quality communities and would support certain legislative changes to strengthen regulation of the industry,” Lindley said in a statement.

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